The Five Best Nonprofit Websites (And Why They Rock)

If you read my last post, “How To Create A Fantastic Non-profit Website”, you know that I spoke about three important elements of npo sites. Throughout this article, I refer back to these best practices, so I’ve quickly summarized them below. (If you read my last article feel free to skip the paragraph below).

Firstly, the best non-profit websites simplify the npo’s mission by prominently displaying a clear “elevator pitch” (an easy to understand summary of the mission). Secondly, the best non-profit websites share their successes with potential donors by talking about specific programs and using both anecdotes and actual data. Thirdly, the best sites make it easy for donors to share in the mission by making the donate button prominent and using inclusive language. 

5 best non-profit websites:

1. Possible Health

They simplify their mission:
They have a clear, simple mission statement. You’re able to understand the organization’s mission almost instantly.
 

They share their successes:

They have created an impact report that’s prominently displayed on the homepage. As you scroll down the homepage, you can easily access more information. Plus, they use both anecdotes and data to show impact.

They make donors share in their mission:

They have coined the term “possibilist,” which labels everyone involved in their mission. Labeling is a really powerful marketing tool and can increase loyalty and donor/customer conversions. Also, they make it easy to donate, by placing a donate button on both the header and footer of the site.

More thoughts:

I love the design of this site (and I’m normally not a pink kind of gal). Beyond pure aesthetic appeal, it’s usable and responsive.

2. Heifer International 

They simplify their mission:

Heifer International’s elevator pitch is written in clear, simple language, that’s easy to understand. It’s also very easy to see.

They share their successes:

Heifer International’s site has a link to a video directly on the home page. Beyond the video, they also provide links to articles with more data, including infographics.

They make donors share in their mission:

There are CTAs throughout the website urging people to give more, making it easy for people to get involved. They use language that empowers people to join their mission (Ex. Navigation links says: “What you can do”).

More thoughts:

They do a great job of highlighting their monthly giving program and employer matching programs directly on their homepage. There is also a CTA on the website’s footer that includes suggested amounts, which encourages people to give more.

3. Exodus Cry

They simplify their mission:

Exodus Cry’s elevator pitch can be found directly below the slider. It’s written in clear, simple language that’s easy for the user to understand.

They share their successes:

Exodus Cry gives users access to information, on both the homepage and on separate site pages. They use anecdotes and data to inform users of their impact. Plus, Exodus Cry also uses a bunch of media formats, ranging from video to infographic.

They make donors share in their mission:

Exodus Cry makes it very easy for users to donate by putting a very clear CTA asking donors to “Give Now,” on the first slide of their slider.

More thoughts

Full disclosure, Exodus Cry and is a Causeview client and uses our ActionPages form on their website. But that has no bearing on my decision to choose their site. Plus, there are other bloggers who agree that their site is awesome. (See articles here and here)

4. Project C.U.R.E

They simplify their mission:

Right as you arrive at Project Cure’s website you’re hit with their elevator pitch.

They share their successes:

They have a great video that combines anecdotes and data about an actual project. They also include links to information about their current projects. They highlight their Ebola relief efforts, capitalizing on the fact that Ebola is topical at the moment.

They make donors share in their mission:

They make it very easy for donors to give by featuring a “give” button on their homepage, and throughout their website.

More thoughts

They highlight their awards and feature a NBC spot on the impact of their organization. This further adds credibility to their cause.

5. Millennium Villages 

They simplify their mission:

The hero image on the website is a question and answer that summarizes their mission.

They share their successes:

They have a series of “stories” that combine anecdotes and data. The stories also contain text, video, and infographics, which help Millennium Villages inform donors of their successes.

They make donors share in their mission:

They make it very easy for donors to give, by featuring a “donate” button on their header and footer. Additionally, they use the word “you” in the sentence featured on their hero image, which is a proven conversion technique.

More thoughts

They have both a “news” and “reports” section, which helps make their cause seem more credible in the eyes of donors.

 

As you can see, there are tons of great non-profit websites out there, but there are even more bad ones. The best non-profit websites put strategy first, by highlighting the organization’s mission and empowering people to donate. Achieving that can be difficult, but it’s extremely important, given the rise in online giving. A bad website will put you at a disadvantage and a good website will help you raise more

What did you think of our choices? What are your favourite non-profit websites? Were there any we missed?

 

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Image 1: Flicker, Eric Cuthbert